Door 2 Tour

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Monday - Friday 9am to 5pm

Winchcombe And Scenic Broadway In The Cotswolds

UK & Ireland
  • Duration: 1 days
  • Board Basis: N/A
  • Tour Ref: D2TBAK7067

Holiday Summary

  • Travel Type: Coach

Winchcombe and scenic Broadway in the Cotswolds

The beautiful and historic Cotswold village of Broadway is a memorable place to stay and a perfect base from which to tour the local area and enjoy the stunning walks. The pretty High Street is lined with horse chestnut trees and includes a mixture of period houses and picturesque honey coloured Cotswold stone cottages which have lured visitors for centuries. Boutiques, shops and little arcades, galleries, tea shops and hotels, there's plentry to wander, browse and enjoy.

The Cotswolds village of Broadway in the English county of Worcestershire is often referred to as the 'Jewel of the Cotswolds' and the 'Show Village of England' because of it's sheer beauty and magnificence. The 'broad way' leads from the foot of the western Cotswolds escarpment with a wide grass-fringed street lined with ancient honey coloured limestone buildings dating back to the 16th century and earlier (the oldest house is Abbots Grange built in 1320 as the summer retreat for the Abbots of Pershore).

Many well known characters have spent time in Broadway drawing inspiration from its beauty and location including Oscar Wilde, Claude Monet, Edwin Abbey, John Singer-Sargent, William Morris and Edward Elgar.

The village is nestled at the foot of Fish Hill (where apparently monks used to store fish and the 18th century 'Fish Inn' once stood). Broadway Tower (sometimes also referred to as Beacon or Fish Inn Tower) is 65ft high and stands atop the hill overlooking the village. A much loved retreat for the Arts and Crafts Movement founder William Morris, this marvellous folly was built by the sixth Earl of Coventry's family in the late 18th century, and on a clear day you can see no fewer than 14 counties from the top of it. As part of an extensive country estate (which also houses an animal park), it lies close to an Anglo-Saxon cemetery, where eight graves complete with knives, spears, beads and brooches were excavated in 1954.

The full extent of Broadway's majesty is its wide street lined with a delightful mix of Tudor, Stuart and Georgian buildings. The village has one of the longest High Streets in England. The village's "broad way" (actually called High Street) lined with red chestnut trees, reflects the varied architectural history from grand Georgian buildings to ones of humbler though quaint beginnings that even reaches back, in places, to the Romans.

The street through Broadway was an ancient 'ridgeway' and the main road from Worcester to London. It is a wide street or 'broad way' hence the name. The village also has an interesting artistic heritage which includes some well known artists, writers, and performing artists such as William Morris, J.M. Barrie and Mary Anderson. The furniture designer Gordon Russell grew up in Broadway and had a workshop here - we now have a great Design Museum.

PRICE FROM ? £20 per person
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