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Great Yarmouth holidays by coach

Great Yarmouth holidays by coach

tip from the team

Lucy B says
If you have a few hours spare (or it's raining!) visit the Time and Tide Museum, a place full of Great Yarmouth's local history.
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Language: English
Currency: Pound Sterling
Time Zone: GMT
Tipping: 10 to 12% is usual for hotels with 10 to 15% being usual for restaurants. In each case, it is not necessarily added to the bill. If a service charge has already been added, no further tip is required.

Having been a flourishing coastal resort since 1760, the once major fishing port of Great Yarmouth has perfected the seaside experience down to a tee. With flashing arcades, seafront illuminations, two lively piers and a popular pleasure beach sporting over 70 rides from fairground classics to speedier white-knuckle affairs, flower gardens and mini-golf, coach holidays to Great Yarmouth have plenty to keep visitors occupied.

Plastic windmills and candy-floss aside, Great Yarmouth has two promenades perfect for embarking on a relaxing stroll, plus 15 miles of sandy beaches to relax on. Maritime heritage also features, with nearby Burnham Thorpe being the birthplace of Lord Nelson. On a coach trip here, you can visit the Norfolk Nelson Museum in South Quay to survey the Trafalgar Drape used in Nelson's funeral, then head to the South Denes area to see Nelson's column, erected some 21 years before it's more famous counterpart in Trafalgar Square.

In addition to return coach travel and a stay at a good quality hotel in resort, usually with some evening entertainment, most Great Yarmouth coach holidays will feature excursions to popular tourist spots within easy reach. The Norfolk Broads, seafood-renowned Cromer and the Queen's private estate of Sandringham are all available options.

To help you have an enjoyable holiday in Great Yarmouth, take a look at these useful tips and advice provided by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO):

Health and Travel Insurance
Crime
Local Laws and Customs
Entry Requirements
Tourist Office

Health and Travel Insurance
British Citizens are advised by some of our tour operators to have travel insurance before going on a tour or holiday, even if it happens to be in your country of residence. As a British citizen you will be entitled to free emergency health care on the NHS.

If you are visiting England from outside the United Kingdom and fall ill or are involved in an accident and are from any member of the European Economic Area or Switzerland, you can obtain free or reduced cost treatment with The European Health Insurance Card (EHIC). Comprehensive travel insurance is advised for all other nationals planning on visiting the England.

If you need to contact the emergency services whilst in England simply dial 999 or 112 to ask for an ambulance.

Crime
Most destinations are generally trouble-free, however as with all places that you are not familiar with, keep an eye on your belongings and if necessary lock them away somewhere safe back at your hotel if possible. Keep an eye on everyone in your party and do not go off with people you do not know. Buy your own drinks and keep sight of them at all times. Be aware of your surroundings and don't venture off on your own.

Local Laws and Customs
Queuing is a British Institution - jump a queue at your own risk!

Drug offences will carry penalties in the UK, so avoid getting involved with anything whilst in England. Please note the narcotic plant Khat/Qat is legal in the UK, but is not in a majority of other countries so never try to export this when leaving the UK.

If you are visiting from outside of the United Kingdom, it is wise to check customs requirements before you travel. If you are planning to bring alcohol, tobacco or souvenirs into the country, you need to be familiar with the UK's custom laws. For those people coming to the UK from the EU, you are allowed to bring an unlimited amount of most goods for your own use without paying tax or duty.

However, if you are travelling to the UK from outside of the EU, you are given an allowance of how much alcohol, tobacco, perfume, souvenirs and other goods. If you go above this allowance you may have to pay tax or duty. It is worth checking the HM Revenues and Customs website before you travel.

Entry Requirements
When travelling between the UK, Northern Ireland, the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man in most cases an official form of identification such as a Driver's License will be ok. However, some airlines will insist you show a passport so check before you travel.

If you are travelling to England from Australia, Canada or the USA, you must have a valid passport for at least three months beyond the length of your stay. EU nationals need to have either a valid passport or identity card.

Visas for the UK are not required by those travelling from Australia, Canada, USA or EU for stays of up to six months.

Any other nationality looking to visit the UK must contact the local embassy to check visa requirements.

Tourist office
For more information about Great Yarmouth you can visit the official tourism website at great-yarmouth.co.uk



There are a few things to do in Great Yarmouth whilst staying here. Some things to think about may include:

The Pleasure Beach
A visit to the Pleasure Beach is a must for people of all ages and there are rides for everyone. Rated in the top 10 of all leisure parks in the country, entrance is free of charge - you just need to pay for any rides that you would like to go on!

Piers
Great Yarmouth has not only one but two piers; Britannia Pier and Wellington Pier. Wellington Pier is the smaller of the two piers but has amusement arcades, bowling and for the over 18's a casino to keep you entertained. Britannia Pier is the second of Great Yarmouth's Piers offering live theatre shows, bars, amusements and rides, as well as a number of cafes and restaurants.

Tide and Time Museum
Discover the history and stories behind Great Yarmouth in this fascinating museum. Set in a Victorian Herring curing works, experience life through the ages in this interactive museum that is great for both children and adults alike.

Great Yarmouth Potteries
This hidden gem is a fully working pottery so you may see someone working on the potter's wheel or glazing or firing the finished product. This is not just a pottery but is also a herring smoking museum and home to a gallery of maritime paintings, sculptors and carvings.

Great Yarmouth was actually home to the first Nelson's column (officially Nelson's Monument). The column in South Denes was built 24 years before the one in Trafalgar Square and was funded by locals after Nelson docked his ship in the port in 1800.